If you can, enjoy the exhibition from a computer to get the full effect.

If not, no worries, a mobile device will work just fine.

September 1 - October 3
2020

Welcome.

home is an online exhibition that brings together artworks created during the COVID-19 worldwide lock-down (since March 13, 2020) by 42 artists residing in 5 countries. Reflecting on the concept of “home” during this new and bizarre time, the artists share their experiences of … well,  home.

When hearing the word “home” we often think of the place where we reside. When the “Shelter-At-Home” orders came in throughout the country and world, many of us found ourselves adapting to a new way of living where we did pretty much everything (i.e. sleeping, working, eating, pooping, loving…)  from a single place––for some, a single room. The home became a place of both respite and stress, leaving us with the necessity to find new ways to be at home.

As a curatorial framework for the online exhibition, the artworks have been gathered into four areas: Little Gestures, Time, Connections, and The In-Between. These areas are less categories and more like “essences” and serve as a means to further the exploration of the artists’ experiences and work. This exhibition is curated and organized by Nicole Rademacher.

Taking advantage of the format of the world (being virtual), there will be weekly Conversations with artists, Instagram Takeovers by artists, and 4 ancillary, artist-run events.

And if you prefer you can also view the works organized chronologically by date completed––scroll down.

Online Activites

Click Tabs

All Artist Conversations will be Broadcast on Facebook Live

Watch Here

Tuesday, Sept. 15, 6:30 – 8:00 pm | Connections
Kenneth Kinsley
Jessica Oler
Laura Paul
Neena Wang

Monday, Sept 21, 6:30 – 8:00 pm | The In-Between
Brandon Barr
Andrea Nhuch
Caroline Yoo

Saturday, Oct. 3, 3:00 – 4:30 pm | Closing Conversation
Enrique Castrejon
Nicholas Frisella
Dulce Soledad Ibarra
Jody Wood

PAST

Wednesday, Sept. 10, 8:00 – 9:30 pm | Time
Evelyn Chavez, Óscar Corona, and Daniela Navarro
Watch Video of Conversation

Wednesday, Sept. 2, 6:30 – 8:00 pm | Little Gestures
Teresa Flores, Renée Fox, Georgina Lewis, and Dena Novak
Watch Video of Conversation

Ace Alamillo
Sept. 9 – 12

Kayla Tange
Sept. 13 – 16

Luciana Abait
Sept. 17 – 20

Xavier Cázares Cortéz
Sept. 21 – 24

Jungmok Yi
Sept. 25 – 28

Connie Fu
Sept. 29 – Oct. 2

PAST

Toban Nichols
Sept. 5 – 8
See Archive

Jerri Allyn
Sept. 2 – 4
See Archive

S.O.S. with Jody Wood
Ongoing
SOSZIP.com

calm and chaos | coexist and collide with Andrea Nhuch
Sunday, Sept. 20, 1:00 pm
Join via Zoom + Watch on Facebook

Live Still-Life with Michael Rippens
Sunday, Sept. 27, 1:00 pm
Join via Zoom + Watch on Facebook

PAST
Kinda Chicana with Teresa Flores
Saturday, Sept. 5, 1:00 pm

Connections

The artists in Connections have explored ways that our ability to connect with one another has shifted and, in some instances, been reinvented during lock-down. The artists share their ways of connecting during this time and also connecting with you the viewer.

Featuring work by Yvette Gellis, Dulce Soledad Ibarra, Kenneth Kinsley, Jessica Oler, Emme Paige, Laura Paul, Michael Rippens, Kayla Tange, Neena Wang, Jody Wood, and Hope Zaccagni.

Yvette Gellis, Covid Poppies, 2020
Jason Chen, Jasaint, 2020

The In-Between

Work in The In-Between delves into the liminal space of then and now or here and there or … We are invited to view the process and plurality of the individual experiences of the artists.

Featuring work by Luciana Abait, Jerri Allyn, Yukako Ando, Brandon Barr, Xavier Cázares Cortéz, Jason Chen, Andrea Nhuch, Sara True Rosenthal, Jungmok Yi, and Caroline Yoo.

Little Gestures

The artworks included in Little Gestures highlight how small things (i.e. movements, notions, objects, thoughts…) have shaped the experience of the artist during these times. The artists invite us to reflect what we are doing or can do to shift our concept of our homes.

Featuring work by Enrique Castrejon, Teresa Flores, Renée Fox, Nicholas  Frisella, Connie Fu, Aska Irie, Georgina Lewis, Schelsey Mahammadie-Sabet, Toban Nichols, Dena Novak, and Paul Pescador.

Toban Nichols
Oscar Corona, Strawberry Flavored Licorice, 2020

Time

In Time, the artists have reflected on how the passage of time whether through nostalgia, pauses, dystopia etc. has supported them in coping during this extended period at home. As viewers, we have been invited by these 10 artists to re-examine our relationship to time.

Featuring work by Ace Alamillo, Nica Aquino, Jose Cabrera, Evelyn Chávez, Óscar Corona, Carol Anne McChrystal, Daniela Navarro, Cécile Ribas, Naomi Tucker, and Surge Witrön

*Some works may be inadvertently cropped. Click on “Full Size” to view the work in its entirety.*
*Scroll down to see list of artworks organized chronologically*

Connections

Dulce Soledad Ibarra

Bolsote (wearable no.3), 2020
bolsas de mercado, buttons, thread
17.5″ x 62″

 

Neena Wang

Never Alone, 2020
oil on canvas
18″ x 24″

 

Yvette Gellis

Covid Poppies, 2020
oil, acrylic, graphite, pieces of cut canvas, designed collage pieces
51.5″ x 41.5″

Emme Paige

My Thought Garden, 2020
Watercolor
9″ x 12″

Kayla Tange

Permanence is Only a Word, 2020
video
03:48

Jessica Oler

Big Bodies, 2020
Paper on canvas; film photography
40″ x 60″

 

Laura Paul

I CAN’T WAIT FOR WORLD TO BE REBORN, 2020
Ink on paper
12″ x 14″

 

 

Jody Wood

S.O.S. (System of Support), 2020
Interactive online project
SOSZIP.com

 

 

 

Hope Zaccagni

Almost-Not Quite, 2020
Colored Pencil, graphite, Sharpie
4″ x 6.25″

Michael Rippens

Still Life: One Hour at Home, 2020
single-channel video
08:02

Kenneth Kinsley

They Don’t Know How to Really Live In the Space, 2020
Acrylic house paint and Lettaset lettering on found wood
9″ x 13″

The In-Between

Brandon Barr

HOW I THINK, 2020
Reflective paint on digital canvas print
30″ x 40″

 

Luciana Abait

Untitled, 2020
C-print
20″ x 16″

Andrea Nhuch

Perambulando | Wondering, 2020
Canvas and thread
24″ x 16.5″

Xavier Cázares Cortéz

THE NEXT DAY (after The Next Day)
From [AD-LIBBED] LINES.
, 2020
Digital print series
Dimensions variable

Yukako Ando

Lattice work [VR], 2020
digital drawing
Dimensions variable

 

Sara True Rosenthal

a raw thing, swing low it sings, that raw thing, 2020
acrylic on canvas
60 x 80 cm

 

 

Jerri Allyn

On the Return of the Holy Prostitute – Proposed: 3-D Shield of Quedishtu for consenting Sex Workers during CoronaV, 2020
Pen, marker on xerox of found image, paper
8.5″ x 11″

Jungmok Yi

i once drowned in the pool of a korean sauna caught in its whirlpool as it drained sucked my foot too hard and i was three and a half., 2020
digital media
8′ x 8′

Jason Chen

Jasaint, 2020
Sumi Ink on Watercolor Paper
Dimensions variable

Caroline Yoo

who, where, i, 2020
LED neon, Neon, Digital Photography
13″ x 40″

 

Little Gestures

Enrique Castrejon

Measure of Pleasure (Stay at Home and Play), 2020
Collage, archival glue, pigment ink and graphite on paper
18″ x 24″

 

Aska Irie

Home Video, 2020
video
01:11 (loop)

Toban Nichols

Corona-fucking-cation, 2020
digitally manipulated photography, single channel audio
03:56

Renée Fox

Ophelia (Falling is Frightening), 2020
Acrylic and colored pencil on panel
18″ x18″

Schelsey Mahammadie-Sabet

Bored, 2020
Acrylic
8.5″ x 11″

Georgina Lewis

how do you sleep at night? part 1, 2020
graphite and acrylic paint on paper
9″ x 12″

 

Teresa Flores

I Got It From My Mama, 2020
video
30:54

 

 

Dena Novak

Alchemy and stars, 2020
Oil paint
3′ x 4′

 

 

Paul Pescador

Working H:27, 2020
Digital C-Print
18″ x 12″

Connie Fu

Possible outcomes (asking for her softness), 2020
Hand-dyed, carded, spun, and knit 100% sheeps wool, with added text
40″ x 48″

Nicholas Frisella

So Cope, 2020
Digital photograph minted into a 1/1 non-fungible token (ERC-721)
3024 x 4032 pixels

Time

Nica Aquino

ISOLATION 2020, 2020
digital video
03:35

 

Surge Witrön

R.S.V.P., 2020
Cardboard, Yupo Paper, Acrylic, Spray Paint, Ink, Readymade-Material
4′ x 4′

Oscar Corona

Strawberry Flavored Licorice, 2020
wire, cotton, and denim
6′ x 2′

Daniela Navarro

2020 Celebration Blues, 2020
Photography
3003px x 3886px

Ace Alamillo

Reality Shift, 2020
Collage and ink on paper
8.5″ x 11″

 

Cécile Ribas

Exhalation_1, 2020
Clay
26 cm x 24 cm x 128 cm

 

 

Naomi Tucker

Milagros cósmicos, 2020
Wood, metal, acrylic, gold leaf, paper
Diptych 7″ x 15″ (7″ x 7″ each)

Jose Cabrera

Los Beatles, 2020
Digital Art: Photoshop
13″ x 19″

Evelyn Chávez

Hollow Time, 2020
DSLR
667px x 1000px

Carol Anne McChrystal

Pasalubong #2, 2020
Handwoven Mylar Food Wrappers, Archival Film, Grommets
34″ x 68″

 

Participating Artists

Luciana Abait was born in Buenos Aires, Argentina. From 1993 to 1997 she attended the National School of Fine Arts “Prilidiano Pueyrredon” in Buenos Aires. She studied Art History at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst and “Literature and Painting” at the University of Cambridge, England. She was a resident artist of Oolite Arts (formerly ArtCenter South Florida) in Miami Beach from 1998 till 2005. She currently lives and works in Los Angeles. She is a resident artist of 18th Street Arts Center in Santa Monica. Abait’s work has been shown in galleries, museums, and international art fairs throughout the United States, Europe, Latin America and Asia. She has completed many public art commissions in the US. Her solo exhibitions include: A Letter to the Future, at Los Angeles International Airport; Flow, Blue, at Rockford College Art Museum, Illinois; Swimming Rooms, Miami-Dade Department of Cultural Affairs, Miami; and Visual Fields, TaiKoo Place, Hong Kong. Abait’s works are held by private, public and corporate collectors from the United States, Europe, Latin America and East Asia. Among these collections are: Florida State University, Permanent Art Collection of Neiman Marcus, Miami- Dade Public Library System, The Related Group, and University of Miami in Florida; Lehigh University Museum and West Collection in Pennsylvania; Sprint Corporation in Missouri; Flint Institute of Arts in Michigan; the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System in Washington D.C. and Freshfields and Swire Properties in Hong Kong.She is the recipient of the 2016 Santa Monica Individual Artist Fellowship Award.

Luciana Abait, Untitled, 2020

Ace Alamillo is a visual artist and musician from the Philippines. He obtained his degree in Studio Arts from Asia Pacific College School of Multimedia Arts. His range of work includes paintings, collages, assemblages, and found objects which often drew on abstraction using lines and schematics. Alamillo is a collage artist and some of his works has been featured by the Scandinavian Collage Museum, Edinburgh Collage Collective and different art communities in the Netherlands, Ireland, and Nebraska. He has also exhibited his works online in England and the United States. He currently resides in Cavite, Philippines.

Ace Alamillo, Reality Shift, 2020

Jerri Allyn is a community-based artist, educator and activist interested in civic engagement through projects that provide forums for multiple voices. Allyn moves fluidly between art settings, academia and targeted communities. She employs graphics, audio, video, interactive installations and performance art, in events that become a part of public life.

Allyn’s current project, Hidden in Plain Site: Human Trafficking, is an awareness and prevention campaign, funded by an Artist in Residence grant from the L.A. Department of Cultural Affairs.

The artist is designing bus posters (installed at vulnerable travel sites), and a series of postcards about trafficking, with suggested actions for intervention (distributed throughout the Port of L.A. San Pedro).

The educator is facilitating Stencil Poster workshops with interested participants to create posters that explore their relationship to freedom and captivity. Their posters will feature a QR-Quick Response code that links to a website with strategies to keep safe from predators in the commercial sex industry, distributed to schools, libraries, via social media, etc.

The activist is a team member of the annual SeeItEndIt.com Film and Art Festival (Sept 28-Oct 3, 2020) – co-organizing artists, resource and advocacy organizations – for a live, virtual streaming event during Covid19.

Allyn (MA Art & Community) is a co-founding member of The Waitresses, Sisters of Survival and Debating Through the Arts, collaborative performance art groups. She has exhibited inter/nationally and been awarded a Rockefeller Foundation Residency, Italy; International Lila Wallace Fellowship, Mexico; and National Endowment for the Arts grants, among others.

Jerri Allyn, On the Return of the Holy Prostitute - Proposed: 3-D Shield of Quedishtu for consenting Sex Workers during CoronaV, 2020

Yukako Ando (b. Osaka, Japan; lives and works in Los Angeles, USA, and Düsseldorf, Germany) received her BA from Kyoto Seika University, Japan and MA from the Kunstakademie Düsseldorf, Germany.

Ando has had solo exhibitions at Commonwealth & Council, Los Angeles, (2019/2015), SG1 Kunstraum, Duisburg (2018), Matthias Erntges Galerie, Düsseldorf (2016), Emil Gallery Studio, Tampere, Finland (2015), 18th Street Arts Center, Santa Monica (2014), Schuebbe Projects, Düsseldorf (2013), Field Sculpture, Bonn (2012), Malkasten, Düsseldorf (2011), and Raum Oberkassel, Düsseldorf (2010).

She has participated in group exhibitions at RAUM für Kunst, Düsseldorf (2019/2018), Schloss Mitsuko, Thürkow (2019), Kunstmuseum Mülheim an der Ruhr (2017), Galerie von der Milwe, Aachen (2016), 18th Street Arts Center, Santa Monica (2016), Santa Monica Museum of Art, Santa Monica (2015), OpenART 2015, Örebro, Sweden (2015), the Kanagawa Arts Theatre (2014), Wilhelm-Lehmbruck Museum, Duisburg (2014), Kunstraum Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf (2014), Organhaus Art Space, Chongqing, China (2013), Olomouc Museum of Art, Olomouc, Czech Republic (2013), Kunstmuseum Solingen, Solingen (2011), the Ueno Royal Museum, Tokyo (2011), and the Japan Foundation, Cologne (2010).

Selected awards and residencies include an artist exchange Germany-Finland, Tampere (2015), an 18th Street Arts Center Visiting Artist Residency, Santa Monica (2014), the Overseas Study Program for Artists, Agency for Cultural Affairs (Bunka-cho), Japan (2013), a Künstlerdorf Schöppingen Foundation Grant for New Media (2013), the 65th Bergischer Kunstpreis (2011), an artist exchange Germany-Croatia, Zagreb (2009), Wilhelm-Lehmbruck Fellowship, Duisburg (2006/2005), Studio Fellowship from the city of Mönchengladbach (2003), and Peter Mertes Fellowship, Bonn (2000).

Yukako Ando, Lattice work [VR], 2020

Nica Aquino is an analogue photographer and multidisciplinary artist currently based in Northeast Los Angeles, where she also works as a full-time gallery curator and cultural programmer. Since work has shut down until further notice, she launched her own virtual art space, MATA ART GALLERY, where you can still enjoy her curatorial projects and programming from the comfort of your own homes.

Brandon Barr received his BFA in Interdisciplinary Arts from the Kansas City Art Institute, and his MFA in Electronic Integrated Arts from Alfred University. He has exhibited nationally and internationally including China and Brazil. Brandon participated in the Kala Art Institute residency program in Berkeley, CA, and exhibited at the Torrance Art Museum and Young Projects gallery in Los Angeles. His multi-media approach explores the intersection of digital content and material phenomena through video, sculpture, painting and interactive installation. He currently resides in Los Angeles, CA.

Brandon Barr, HOW I THINK, 2020

Jose Cabrera is a Los Angeles based artist influenced by Latino African and Asian cultures and his love for comics.

Jose Cabrera, Los Beatles, 2020

Enrique Castrejon is a 48 year-old Queer Mexican immigrant artist that loves to measure what he sees, in order, to investigate and question what he observes by breaking things apart and reassembling them again. He works as a Senior Research Coordinator at the LA LGBT Center for a research study called mSTUDY that is looking at the affects of drug use on the immune system of HIV positive Black and Latino men who have sex with men. He enjoys working within the LGBTQ community while balancing an art career. He has shown throughout various galleries and museums in Los Angeles including the Armory Center of the Arts, Los Angeles Contemporary Exhibitions (LACE), Museum of Latin American Art (MOLAA); LA Municipal Art Gallery at Barnsdall Park and Highway’s Performance Space; nationally, at the Leslie-Lohman Museum of Gay & Lesbian Art in NY and the Mexican Institute, Washington, DC; internationally at the Museo de Arte Carrillo Gil in Mexico City and Preview Art Fair in Berlin, Germany; just to name a few. He is a recipient of a COLA 2019 Individual Artist Fellowship grant from the City of Los Angeles. He received his MFA from CalARTS and BFA from ArtCenter College of Art & Design and a B.A. in Chicano/a Studies from Cal State Northridge. His work is represented by Bermudez Projects, Los Angeles. He lives and works in Los Angeles, CA.

Enrique Castrejon, Measure of Pleasure (Stay at Home and Play), 2020

Xavier Cázares Cortéz was born on a hot summer Yuma, Arizona-evening on August 20, 1966 to Francisco (Pancho) Cortéz Noriega and Emma Cázares de Cortéz. His hardworking father, Francisco, was born in Douglas, Arizona to parents of Mexican Indian descent, in a dirt floor house. His iron-willed and loving mother was born in 1934 to Mexican parents in a rock shelter in the historically famous mountaintop Mexican copper mining town of Cananea, Sonora, Mexico.

Shy of a few months of his first birthday, Cortéz’s parents along with his four brothers, two sisters, arrived by happenstance at the Kennedy Brothers Ranch in the Coachella Valley in Southern California looking for work in 1967. They were running low on fuel—both food and gas–on an unplanned return trip to Tacna, Arizona from a job lead in Oxnard, California that did not pan out for his father. At the time, the Kennedy Brothers Ranch was located in unincorporated Riverside County lands on Jefferson Boulevard in the eastern Coachella Valley near the unincorporated town of Thermal. The Ranch extended past the local branch of the All-American Canal which emptied into the nearby murky Lake Cahuilla, and abruptly stopped at the majestic eastern face of the Santa Rosa mountains. The Kennedy Brothers Ranch was the artist’s home until age 11 before his family subsequently moved to the City of Coachella. Cortéz has remarked, “In retrospect, the privacy (isolation) of the desert landscape, particularly these mountains—the Santa Rosas—were an immensely important backdrop during my formative years.”

Xavier Cázares Cortéz, THE NEXT DAY (after The Next Day) From [AD-LIBBED] LINES. (series), 2020

Evelyn Chavez is a Mexican-American artist with a psychology background based in Los Angeles. Her focus in fine-art photography is aimed at stimulating emotion and thought. As such, she seeks to induce a storytelling wonder through her conceptual images. Within her genre she explores wild and street landscapes, architecture, and individuality. Not only is she inspired by reality, she aims to isolate the perception that creates it.

Evelyn Chavez, Hollow Time, 2020

Jason Chen graduated from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago (SAIC) in 2017. He is now a traveling tattoo artist between New York, LA, and Taipei. Due to Covid he now resides permanently in LA and hones his tattooing craft. Working in the extremes, he experiments between abstract minimalist lineworks that explores his client’s internal consciousness and upbringings to highly detailed illustrative works of myths and legends. Black and white works of Demons and Gods, The Self and the World. Pick your poison.

Jason Chen, Jasaint, 2020

Óscar Corona is a queer visual artist residing in Los Angeles County. They are interested in objecthood, sculpture, experimental video, and 2D works. A bulk of their work surveys identity politics in terms of being gay, questioning gender, latinidad. The process/dematerialization of assimilation, and the spiritual connection between the corporeal body and the land.

Óscar has synesthesia, which serves as major tool in their work that relies on specific use of color/textures, material and immaterial choices that result in the manifestation of their overall aesthetic. Oscar is interested in the transfer of energy through object making and the medicinal healing properties as a result. They view art making as an overall healing process/experience and their work is in congruent with those themes. Oscar hopes to return to school after COVID and obtain their MFA at UCLA. For now, their art making practice and “studio” pertains to the limitations of their bedroom.

Oscar Corona, Strawberry Flavored Licorice, 2020

Teresa Flores is an interdisciplinary artist based in Los Angeles. Her work examines identity and wellness and includes drawing, video and social practices. Flores has led programs at Los Angeles County Museum of Art, the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego and Spike Art Quarterly in Berlin and her artwork was featured in the exhibition Centennial, 100 Years of Otis College Alumni. She has taught Visual Culture at California State University, Fresno and for the Armory Center for the Arts in Pasadena. She holds an MFA in Public Practice from Otis College of Art and Design and most recently received a Certificate of Appreciation from the City of Los Angeles for her project, Experimental Quesadilla Lab.

Renée graduated from Otis College of Art & Design in 2002. She has exhibited nationally from 2002 to present and established a public art practice. Since 2013 she completed eight large scale public murals throughout Los Angeles, including Songs of Freedom, Renée A Fox + Write Girl curated by Elizabeta Betinski, at LAX 2019-20. Currently underway is a permanent commission for LA County; Hills of the San Gabriels, to be installed at the Olive View Restorative Care Village by UCLA’s medical center in Sylmar in July 2021.

Renée Fox, Ophelia (Falling is Frightening)

Nicholas Frisella is a graduate of The School of the Art Institute of Chicago. Born left handed on Christmas day, he has always felt compelled to tell a story. Drawing and creating things was a need of his early on. As he grew older he began making short videos with his family’s VHS recorder. Video allowed him to add more details to his story telling; stories that he felt were often difficult to get out of his head. After high school he attended community college to save money while he decided what path to take. His sculpture teacher encouraged him to bring his portfolio to the St. Louis Art Museum where instructors from SAIC were hosting a portfolio day. Nicholas brought some of his physical sculptures with him and was informed that typically potential students bring slides of their three dimensional work. Perhaps this made a lasting impression as he was asked to attend. His focus was broad and included: creative writing, photography, videography and painting with print making. His biggest influence was instructor Deborah Stratman. Nicholas spent most of his time in the studio creating with his peers. He had never been exposed to people he could relate to. After graduating, Nicholas stayed in Chicago to pursue his ambition of becoming a working artist. He worked as a bouncer at a local bar at night and created during the day. Marketing himself was never his strong suit and eventually he moved back to St. Louis.

Through the act of creating, Nicholas was able to quiet his mind. He suffers from anxiety, depression and PTSD. He believes it is difficult to see the path in front of him. Making things allows him to hyper focus and it’s during these moments he feels most calm. Nicholas enjoys the works of Francis Bacon. Francis saw people for what they are — meat, flesh, and bone. Ugly yet beautiful at the same time. Francis Bacon would isolate himself and obsess over his creations and break things.

Nicholas Frisella, So Cope, 2020

Connie Fu is an American-born daughter of Chinese immigrants. She is a transdisciplinary artist working primarily in fibers, performance, and music to reconfigure her family’s traditions as hybrids of her dual upbringing. Her work has been exhibited at Maelstrom Collaborative Arts (Cleveland, OH), FiveMyles (Brooklyn, NY), and La MaMa Theatre (New York, NY). Recent honors include fellowships at Ox-Bow School of Art (Saugatuck, MI), Vermont Studio Center (Johnson, VT), and Chautauqua School of Art (Chautauqua, NY). Fu resides in Cleveland, OH and is the Gallery Director of Praxis Fiber Workshop, a nonprofit community fiber studio and educational center.

Connie Fu, Possible outcomes (asking for her softness), 2020

American artist Yvette Gellis lives and works in Los Angeles, California. After attending UCLA and Art Center College of Design in Pasadena CA, she received her M.F.A. in 2008 from Claremont Graduate University. Born and raised in the Chicago area, the vast open terrain in contrast to the urban sprawl set up structures for her painting that echo or reiterate the impermanent and mutable states depicted in her work. Or put another way, her painting is not simply static, an illusion or picture of an event, but allows for participation in the event itself. While ever conscious of historical precedents, she strives to expand upon the boundaries of painting.

Ms. Gellis has exhibited nationally and internationally including: The Pasadena Museum of California Art / The Landesgalerie Museum for Modern and Contemporary Art, Linz, Austria / Villenaux La Grande, St. Jacques Eglise, Dival, France / The Torrance Art Museum, California / Soulangh Cultural Park and Museum, Tainan / The East-Gate Museum, Cao Shan Dong Men Art Museum, Yangmingshan, Taipei, Taiwan / Los Angeles International Airport, LA Department of Cultural Affairs / Fellows of Contemporary Art, LA / West Art Gallery, California State University, Northridge, CA / Cerritos College Art Gallery, CA / The 18th Street Arts Center in Santa Monica and Upcoming, Pasadena City College, California in tandem with Elliott Hundley.

Yvette Gellis, Covid Poppies, 2020

Dulce Soledad Ibarra is a multidisciplinary artist, designer, and curator with investments in community and identity-emphasized arts and opportunity. As a practicing artist, Ibarra discusses issues of generational guilt and cultural identities in videos, installations, and performances, site/community-specific, and participatory work. Looking through queer Xicanx perspective, the work is fueled by emotional labor, personal research and analysis. Currently, the work is centered around the Piñata/Party Supply District of Downtown Los Angeles, engaging in the means of sustaining as a community of businesses and as a place of cultural familiarities and commodities. Ibarra has exhibited, screened, performed, and programmed at venues across Southern California, including Angels Gate Cultural Center, Charlie James Gallery, Consulado General de México en Los Ángeles, Craft Contemporary, Echo Park Film Center, Guggenheim Gallery at Chapman University, Human Resources Los Angeles, ONE Gallery, West Hollywood, Ontario Museum of History and Art, and Pieter Performance Space, among others. Ibarra holds an MFA from the University of Southern California and earned a BFA in Sculpture from California State University, Long Beach.

Dulce Soledad Ibarra, Bolsote (wearable no.3), 2020

Born and raised in Japan, Irie completed her undergraduate coursework at the National School of Painting, Sculpture, and Printmaking (La Esmeralda). Solo shows include La Estacion Arte Contemporaneo, Mexico, Gallery Lara, Tokyo and McNish Gallery, Oxnard, CA. Her work has been exhibited in group shows at MUCA Roma in Mexico City, GR2 and JAUS in Los Angeles, and Axis Gallery in Sacramento in California. Aska Irie currently lives and works in Los Angeles, CA.

Kenneth A. Kinsley is a visual arts teacher for LAUSD who has been working on various forms of art for as long as he can remember. Until now, art has mostly been a solitary pursuit.

Kenneth Kinsley, They Don’t Know How to Really Live In the Space, 2020

Georgina Lewis is an interdisciplinary artist and curator with a practice that includes drawing, sound, writing, photography, sculpture, and installation. Raised in Pennsylvania and Nova Scotia, she received her MFA in Sound from Bard College and holds undergraduate degrees from the School of the Museum of Fine Arts at Tufts and Franklin and Marshall College. She has been a resident at the Millay Colony, the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts, and VCCA France, and a fellow at Harvard University’s metaLAB. She is a member of Fountain Street Gallery, Boston, one of the studio artists at the Boston Center for the Arts, and a former member of the Boston based new technologies group Collision Collective. Her work has been presented at numerous venues including the Visual Studies Workshop, National University of Ireland, REDCAT Los Angeles, Boston Cyberarts Gallery, the Mills Gallery, Boston University’s 808 gallery, Grapefruits Art Space in Portland OR, and AREA CODE art fair.

Georgina Lewis, how do you sleep at night? part 1, 2020

Schelsey Mahammadie-Sabet is an artist in Los Angeles.

Schelsey Mahammadie-Sabet, Bored, 2020

Born into the dual diaspora of the Philippines and Ireland, Carol Anne McChrystal is a Los Angeles–based artist and designer. As part of the collaborative duo Nightmare City, she has created immersive environments that have been exhibited at Alter Space in San Francisco, The Luminary in St. Louis, and Horse and Pony in Berlin, and has shown video works at Essex Flowers in New York, MASS Gallery in Austin, and ACRETV in Chicago. Her writing has been published in arts platforms like Art Practical and Temporary, and she recently self-published a collection of poetry titled, “Entropical Latitudes.” In tandem with her art practice, she organizes within the local Filipino community in Los Angeles with GABRIELA, the anti-imperialist Filipino women’s group.

Carol Anne McChrystal, Pasalubong #2, 2020

Daniela Navarro is a Photography and Art History major at Citrus College. She has worked and been published with the school newspaper “The Clarion” and “Logos” campus magazine. Daniela’s journey to college began with an ASL class, her son is unable to communicate verbally due to his medical condition. Daniela hopes to continue her journey with photojournalism and strengthened her photography skills.

Daniela Navarro, 2020 Celebration Blues, 2020

Andrea Nhuch is a multidisciplinary visual artist based in Los Angeles. She transforms pedestrian materials into abstract objects. Bubble wrap, plaster, wire, canvas, ceramic, thread and consumer packaging are combined, glued, stitched and/or screwed together. She is drawn to the rawness, simplicity and purity of ordinary materials. Her practice is characterized by the use of texture and volume to create space, expanding the surface until it protrudes into new forms. Her work is fundamentally, regardless of format, sculptural in nature. Nhuch has shown in galleries, art centers and international fairs including NADA, Locust Projects, @gallery in Miami; Art and Culture Center of Hollywood in Florida, and Phyllis Harriman Mason Gallery in NYC. She has completed public and private commissions including Superficies curated by the Bass Museum in partnership with the City of Miami Beach in 2013 and Sisters for ICArt in 2015.

Andrea Nhuch, Perambulando | Wondering, 2020

Toban Nichols, is a visual artist and filmmaker from Los Angeles. His work has been seen in film festivals & galleries around LA, in Romania, Israel, & the Netherlands. He was also featured in Pop Rally at The Museum of Modern Art in New York City.

After earning a Bachelors degree in painting, he studied New Media at the San Francisco Art Institute in California where he received an MFA in New Genres. He has been granted a residency with the Experimental Television Center in New York, and awarded the Juror’s Pick at the ArtHouse Film Festival for his video entitled “BATTLESTATIONS!!

In the past eight years Nichols launched a line of textiles, created a photo app for iDevices worldwide and published his first photo book titled ‘MY TWIN’.

He is currently in post production on his first feature length documentary titled “Beyond the Trees” for wide release in 2021.

Dena Novak was born in Chicago and raised in West Rogers park. She went to the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. She then did a degree at the Colorado College and a M.A.T in art education. She has taught art and raised 2 girls. One of her daughters has Ehlers-Danlos and autism. Her daughter lives for her art. Novak lives in Los Angeles with her husband.

Dena Novak, Alchemy and stars, 2020

Jessica Susan Oler is a Conceptual Artist. She earned her Master’s in Fine Arts from California College of the Arts in 2019. In addition to her Master’s Degree, she has earned her Bachelor’s Degree in Sociology from San Francisco State University and three Associates Degrees in Social Science, Liberal Arts, and Sociology. Since earning her Master’s she has successfully completed the Visual Art Residency in Chautauqua, New York. In addition to this she has been in art shows in Chautauqua, New York; Alexandria, NSW, Australia; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Oakland and San Francisco, California; and Miami, Florida. Oler also has had the honor of being invited to speak at the School of Nursing at UC Davis for a ‘Race and Health’ seminar composed of graduate and medical students. There, she presented her research surrounding the navigation of disease development and artistic work. She views the human body as a landscape. Similar to the land we traverse, we are made of histories. Put together, taken apart, shaped, reshaped, stood upon, slain upon. Forgotten and remembered.

Jessica Oler, Big Bodies, 2020

Emme Paige has only been painting regularly for the last couple of months but began her experimentation in watercolors when she was living in Honduras. It has become an outlet for her to express the images that sometimes come to her when she is working through her own thoughts and emotions.

Emme Paige, My Thought Garden, 2020

Laura Paul is an artist and writer living in Los Angeles. Her work has been published by the Brooklyn Rail, Coffin Bell Journal, Dream Pop Journal, Entropy Magazine, FIVE:2:ONE, Grama, Luna Luna Magazine, Shirley Magazine, and featured at the West Hollywood Book Fair and Los Angeles Zine Fair. She earned her B.A. from the University of Washington, Seattle, where she was named a Mary Gates Scholar in the Arts and Humanities, and her Master’s from UCLA, where she was the recipient of the 2011 Gilbert Cates Fellowship.

Laura Paul, I CAN'T WAIT FOR WORLD TO BE REBORN, 2020

Paul Pescador is an artist, filmmaker, performer and writer. They graduated with an MFA from University of California, Irvine and a BA from the University of Southern California. Select exhibitions and screenings include: X-TRA Online; Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA); The Pit, Glendale; 18th Street Art Center, Santa Monica; UV Estudios, Buenos Aires; gallery1993, Los Angeles; Coastal/Borders, Getty Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA at Angels Gate Cultural Center; Ashes/Ashes, Park View, The Main Museum, and gallery1993, all Los Angeles. Their first collection of writing, CRUSHES: A NOVELLA, was published by Econo Textual Objects in Spring 2017.

Paul Pescador, Working H:27, 2020

With my sculptural work I experiment and reflect on the connection between the form, matter and essence of what life represents. Space, time, movement, cell division, the elements that grow and multiply, the breath, death, and also the form of what rots, disappears… those are concepts that become organic, universal and basic shapes, almost known.

Cécile Ribas, Exhalation_1, 2020

Michael Rippens is a multidisciplinary artist born and raised in the San Gabriel Valley. He earned a BFA in painting from Pratt Institute and has exhibited paintings, sculptures, installations and performance-based art in L.A., New York, Miami, and Berlin. His current work focuses on performance and socially engaged art projects. Recent highlights include being selected by Metro Art to create a site-specific work at L.A.’s Union Station, participating in a show of L.A.-based Filipinx-American artists at Avenue 50 Studio in Highland Park, and being selected as an Artist-in-Residence at Side Street Projects in Pasadena.

Sara True Rosenthal is a multimedia artist hailing from Los Angeles, whose work encompasses performance art, video, painting, installation, writing, and sound. She graduated with a BA Fine Arts from UC Santa Cruz in California and an MA Performance, Design, and Practice from Central Saint Martins in London. She has also studied at the Hellenic International School of the Arts on Paros Island and at the Bezalel Academy of Art and Design in Jerusalem. Her work has been exhibited internationally and she has participated in collaborative performance projects in Finland, Italy, Spain, and Greece. She has recently performed at the Jerusalem Biennale in Israel and presented a solo exhibition at Two Thirds Project Space in Athens, Greece.

Sara True Rosenthal, a raw thing, swing low it sings, that raw thing, 2020

Kayla Tange was born in South Korea and adopted by a Japanese American family in Lemoore, California. After highschool she moved to Los Angeles where her love for poetry and photography slowly progressed into a conceptual performance practice which incorporates elements of exotic dancing in which physical and psychic boundaries, sexuality, permanence, are recurring themes. She has performed burlesque, collaborative art and ancestral healing at venues around Los Angeles, New York and internationally. She often uses dark comedy in her performance work to explore love and longing, cultural stereotyping and societal taboos, catharsis and fetish.

Naomi Tucker is a Los Angeles-based artist and art therapist. She studied psychology and studio art at the University of Iowa and Kunst Gemeind Schule in Zürich. She apprenticed with a potter and took classes at the Archie Bray Institute in Montana. She is focused on the process of creating art and has fired wood kilns in Montana, Iowa, Switzerland and with porcelain in Denmark. She often uses an X-Acto knife to create playspace for light and shadow. This echoes her work as an art therapist where she helps clients shine light on and through their stories and experiences.

Tucker has a private practice where she sees individuals working on issues including relationships, anxiety & depression, career, maternal mental health, fertility, communication and creativity. She is a Senior Lecturer at Loyola Marymount University in the Department of Marital and Family Therapy with Specialized Training in Clinical Art Therapy. She has worked at LMU’s Helen B Landgarten Art Therapy Clinic since 2010. She also facilitates Art Therapy groups at a residential treatment facility for mental health. Naomi was fortunate to have the opportunity to learn Spanish and research art therapy in Mexico

Naomi Tucker, Milagros cósmicos, 2020

Neena Wang (b. Memphis, TN) lives and works in Los Angeles.

Neena Wang, Never Alone, 2020

Surge Witrön is an emerging artist currently residing in the LA/Orange County area. Working out of his art studio in “Little Tokyo” of downtown Los Angeles, his explorative process produces works that combine coexistent traditions in abstract painting, mark making, visual D.N.A. and site specific.

Witrön has exhibited his work in numerous exhibitions in Los Angeles, San Francisco, Mexico City. Some selected exhibitions
include “QiPo Art Fair 02” at CDMX, “Play” at the Los Angeles Municipal Art Gallery (LAMAG).

Surge Witrön, R.S.V.P., 2020

Jody Wood is an artist working in mediums of social practice, video, photography, and performance. Her recent work reimagines routines in poverty support agencies, aiming to shift power dynamics and resist stigmas surrounding poverty. Her community-based work has been supported by prestigious institutions including A Blade of Grass, Esopus Foundation, Rema Hort Mann Foundation, an ArtPlace America Initiative at McColl Center for Art + Innovation, and through residencies at Headlands Center for the Arts, Yaddo, and Skowhegan School for Painting and Sculpture. Her work has been exhibited internationally at Manchester School of Art, UK; Parrish Museum of Art in Water Mill, NY; and FIVAC in Camaguey, Cuba and has been featured in publications such as The Atlantic, Hyperallergic, The Art Newspaper, and MSNBC.

Jody Wood, S.O.S. (System of Support), 2020
http://www.SOSZIP.com

Jungmok Yi is a queer non-binary 1.5 generation Korean-American immigrant and transdisciplinary artist who works with performance, installation, video, writing, and workshops. Born and raised in South Korea, they moved to Southern California when they were 13. Jungmok cultivated their voice as an artist at Pasadena City College and California State University, Long Beach, where they studied ceramics and sculpture. Over the years their work has addressed themes including the duality and contradiction of identities resulting from spending the first half of their life in Seoul and the second half in the U.S and transitioning to a non-binary persyn. They hold an MFA from Tyler School of Art, Temple University in North Philadelphia.

Jungmok Yi, i once drowned in the pool of a korean sauna caught in its whirlpool as it drained sucked my foot too hard and i was three and a half. , 2020

Caroline Yoo is an artist and archivist performing history.

Born to Korean immigrants in Lawrence, Kansas and raised in Anglo-centric suburbs, Yoo’s past informs her work exploring the boundaries between belonging, othering, and being.

“TO BE”

Using her body as vessel, she poses questions on larger topics of power structures and embedded cultural norms in relation to immigration, race, gender, and sexuality.

“OTHERING IN BELONGING”

By re-fabricating colonial and patriarchal narratives, archiving moments of the present, her works attempt to show an unabashed glimpse of what one version of diary, reality, and fantasy of an Asian-American, a Korean, a Korean-American woman can be.

“TO BE”

Unshackling, processing, and releasing.
Yoo strives to level platforms,
seeing hierarchy for equality,
in an attempt to inch towards alternate societal norms, unbound by binaries.

“BELONGING IN OTHERING”

Yoo graduated Washington University in St. Louis with a BFA in Studio Art in 2017 and is based in Los Angeles, California. She is an educator, curator, and avid community builder. She is currently an MFA candidate at Carnegie Mellon.

“TO BE”

Caroline Yoo, who, where, i, 2020

Hope Zaccagni graduated from The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill with a Bachelor of Arts in Fine Arts with a concentration in painting and sculpture. In her extensive career as an artist she has been a fine art silver & goldsmith, a puppeteer and puppet maker/designer, and a costume and set designer/fabricator but is currently focused on painting, primarily in oil. She has shown her paintings in numerous group and solo shows in the northeast. Her work is in several public permanent collections and many private collections. She maintains a studio in Alfred Station, NY.

Hope Zaccagni, Almost-Not Quite, 2020

Artworks Organized Chronologically by Date Completed

March 2020

Jody Wood

S.O.S. (System of Support)
Interactive online project

SOS (System of Support) endeavors to create an online platform that connects those in need with people who can help using a format according to zip code. The project promotes lateral caregiving whereby participants can be in need and helping at the same time. I am particularly committed to creating a low-barrier platform that is easy to use for people of any age group, and invites participation regardless of housing and citizenship status. People can use the website SOSZIP.com to connect with individuals to exchange resources in whatever zip code they are in. The project anticipates an urgent social need for community care in a national austerity period to follow COVID-19.

www.SOSZIP.com

Laura Paul

I CAN’T WAIT FOR WORLD TO BE REBORN
Ink on paper
12″ x 14″

Laura Paul, I CAN'T WAIT FOR WORLD TO BE REBORN, 2020

Over the past year, my language and syntax has changed in ways that make it impossible for me to divorce meaning from the aesthetics of words.

April 2020

Paul Pescador

Working H:27
Digital C-Print
18″ x 12″

Paul Pescador, Working H:27, 2020

Over the past few months, I have shifted my studio practice into my small apartment in Santa Monica. Slowly producing simple images from objects from my house and using my kitchen table and outside patio as a staging ground for these new images. These simple gestural images exist in their playful world, while being produced at a time of personal isolation and global fear and anxiety.

Cécile Ribas

Exhalation_1
Clay
26cm x 24cm x 128cm

When the state of alarm was decreed, I had been unable to use my workshop for more than four months. It is a 500-meter ship that had been left without a roof last October when a tornado passed through town. However, I had not had the idea of ​​setting up a temporary workshop at home until the quarantine was announced. I moved the sofa and two armchairs and put a small table in its place with the idea of ​​creating small works to pass the time.

In my work I like to reflect on the pulse of life and this global crisis was somehow affecting all our lives. Another concept that moves me in general but in those weeks more especially, is the idea of ​​time; the time we have, the time lost, the time we have left to live … what to do with all that time?

This piece was born in a very organic way. At last I had a space to work that nobody could take me out of, and I also had time. Long time. Time that didn’t needed to be productive. Like a timeout. The idea that everything I could make in those days was a gift made me want to make some big, impractical piece, the one that I always left for “when I have time”.

This piece represents an organ that has been removed from its environment. From the top it exhales and through its cut off branches small drops of life escape. It is for me an image of those days, where the need to go out and breathe fresh air and feeling life in connection with the most essential, was constantly confronted with the danger of breathing and going out, since it also meant exposing oneself to death.

Enrique Castrejon

Measure of Pleasure (Stay at Home and Play)
Collage, archival glue, pigment ink and graphite on paper.
18″ x 24″

Enrique Castrejon, Measure of Pleasure (Stay at Home and Play), 2020

For this exhibition, I decided to use the drawing titled “Measure of Pleasure (Stay at Home and Play)” as a playful yet thoughtful gesture of what people staying at home may include to stay safe, self care and add pleasure to their day or night. This image of a colorful adult toy (butt plug) found in a magazine provided a great visual stimulus to draw and celebrate this toy’s contribution to pass time and reduce possible anxiety, uncertainty, and continued change brought about staying at home during a pandemic.

In this drawing I measured the shape’s contour to investigate the pleasurable lengths this toy provides. Measuring the small incremental lengths of the shape in (x inches) and calculating the varied angle degrees (y degrees) between these lengths using a protractor. Measured inches and angle degrees explode outward from their point of origin with drawn lines around the contour shape, lead the eye to the specific quantified unit at the end creating an aura of ordered data.

Overall, I create measured drawings and installations to investigate and question what I see. I linearly cut, dissect and deconstruct appropriated images into fragmented shapes while trying to maintain the image content. I investigate how these shapes influence our visual perception, impact the content and affect our understanding of it. I question our perception of what is real, what is made up and manipulated, forcing us to think critically about information that is constantly bombarding our everyday lives through advertisements, news, and social media.

Michael Rippens

Still Life: One Hour at Home
single-channel video
08:02

Still Life: One Hour at Home is part of an ongoing series of durational works in which I attempt to stand perfectly still in a public space for one hour. Typically performed outdoors, due to social distancing and stay-at-home orders, I chose instead to spend an hour standing alone in my living room, staring through the window at the outside world.

My work considers issues surrounding systemic inequality and imagines alternative ways to bridge gaps in existing structures. My projects reach across barriers, real and perceived, to emphasize the importance of human connection. Through performance, participatory works, and socially engaged projects, I initiate unexpected, personal interactions that build community, spur dialogue, and encourage reflection.

Hope Zaccagni

Almost-Not Quite
Colored Pencil, graphite, Sharpie
4″ x 6.25″

Hope Zaccagni, Almost-Not Quite, 2020

“Almost-Not Quite” is a small drawing from my sketchbook that I did shortly after the shut down. Ironically, prior to the shut down, I was working on some ideas for paintings about social connection. Once we shut down, I shifted my focus to ideas about social distancing with the intention of doing a series of larger oil paintings based on the “before and after” shut down sketches. That series is in progress as I continue to work in my sketchbook daily. This style and subject matter is a real departure from what I usually paint but it seems appropriate for the times. I have been using these last few months to explore and experiment with different styles and mediums. Some good things have come out of it and some really bad art has happened as well. But I feel like this is the perfect time to stretch regardless of the outcomes.

Sara True Rosenthal

a raw thing, swing low it sings, that raw thing
acrylic on canvas
60 x 80 cm

Sara True Rosenthal, a raw thing, swing low it sings, that raw thing, 2020

My partner and I had been living together for the first time while I did a two-month-long artist residency in Athens, Greece when Coronavirus hit. During this period of creation, I was exploring ideas around metamorphosis and transformation in nature and myth- women who turn into trees, men who become flowers, mushrooms that grow out of the bodies of insects, wasps that transform into figs. I am intrigued by transitions and what exists between stages of a process. The coronavirus lockdown has presented one such liminal stage, a period of waiting, of neither here nor there. When the lockdown began, I decided to stay in Athens, living with my partner. It seemed that letting that relationship evolve was as good a way to weather the storm of global uncertainty as any. And in the process, over months of being stuck together all the time, my concept of home has shifted to include this person in my life. Which also means including the strangeness of living with someone else, and the frequent unfamiliarity that that entails; the feeling of being next to someone so intimately known, and recognizing that they are also completely foreign. This recognition can provoke an unsettling, uncanny awareness of alienness. The process of redefining home to incorporate this person combines this disturbing realisation with an ecstatic acceptance of the alterior being with whom I share my house and time. These combinations are included in this painting, which seeks to express my evolving interaction with a beloved Other, and how the shifting unfamiliar exists within the familiar space of home.

Kayla Tange

Permanence is Only a Word
video
03:48

Boundaries, transformation, memory and redefining ancestral trauma are recurring themes in my work, where public spaces transform into a container to examine patterns. The life of each participant becomes a vital element in an immersive narrative – combining movement, music and more recently sculpture, video and installation. Coupling my experiences and a fascination for admission, the perpetual limbo lack of belonging creates, while recalibrating my own sexuality, the pieces are created to facilitate meaningful dialogue and engagement, highlighting our common human condition, our need for connection.

The works are inspired by my journey of identity defining, researching my ancestry, and the circumstances and politics in which I was adopted, often communicating what it feels like to be tied between the two cultures I have been raised in and a symbol of redemption for my birth mothers lack of choice.

This work was made in collaboration with Luka Fisher and Chuck Hohng.

May 2020

Dulce Soledad Ibarra

Bolsote (wearable no.3)
bolsas de mercado, buttons, thread
17.5″ x 62″

Dulce Soledad Ibarra, Bolsote (wearable no.3), 2020

This artwork stems from a bigger project called 9th to Olympic, which focuses on the Piñata District. The Los Angeles Piñata District is a regional landmark colored with culture, art, community, and Latinx (primarily Mexican) migrant methods of survival. My initial fascination with the district has since developed into a deeper relationship and/or commitment to the laborers there, creating a sustained exchange of conversations and commerce across time. The resiliency of laborers and small business owners is tested daily, and the implications COVID-19 have only maximized the need for adaptable and sustainable praxis. In a time of uncertain change and transition, this project utilizes artistic community engagement as a means to radically organize and collaborate within a fixed capitalistic system that disproportionately effects working-class, migrant folk.

Connie Fu

Possible outcomes (asking for her softness)
Hand-dyed, carded, spun, and knit 100% sheeps wool, with added text
40″ x 48″

Connie Fu, Possible outcomes (asking for her softness), 2020

In March 2020, I made a commitment to and knit a pair of socks each month for a year using yarn that I’ve dyed and spun. Socks are mundane and cozy objects that became more significant as I sheltered in Michigan with my parents and sister for two months. They are cocoon-like, providing shelter for the feet whilst also keeping them separated from the outside. Possible outcomes (asking for her forgiveness) is the third pair of socks in the series, wherein the pair meet in a temple-like formation to become one. The form reflects the growing feelings I have had toward socks as I learn the ins and outs of making them.

Daniela Navarro

2020 Celebration Blues
Photography
3003px x 3886px

Daniela Navarro, 2020 Celebration Blues, 2020

As a young girl boredom and curiosity would follow me around the house. Getting a pocket-size mirror, facing it towards the ceiling, and squinting my eye on it was my past time. An upside down world created and I would explore it walking, bumping, jumping and knocking everything around the house. It would anger my mom, “chiquita what’s wrong with you?” Covid-19 brought the memories back.

Photography during the pandemic became my pocket-size mirror. Creating 2020 Celebration Blues during the pandemic was my way of escaping the reality of what the world had become.

Brandon Barr

HOW I THINK
Reflective paint on digital canvas print
30″ x 40″

The work from my “Flash Painting” series uses fragments from various social media captions I have found online, which are painted onto a digital canvas print using reflective paint. Whether it is scrolling through Instagram or Twitter, the text often implies a personal opinion from that user, but the sections I have taken out can also be interpreted within a much broader context. Captions like “Conspicuously absent” or “am i enough, am i too much” combines two contrasting ideas and also refers to the way in which many of us interact on social media. We present ourselves to potentially millions of people while physically hiding behind the screens of our devices in solitude. The printed background is also a combination of a digital painting and found photos that have been blurred out.

The work itself also needs to exist in two places. You have to use the camera flash of your phone to view the reflective paint. Once this happens, the piece lives on as a physical painting and a flattened digital file, both needing each other in order to complete the artwork.

“How I Think, How I Am” is a spin off of the “expectation vs reality” meme often seen on the internet. As many of us are scratching that social itch by interacting and sharing online right now, this one in particular stood out to me. With a growing pandemic, our expectations continuously fail to be met while reality slowly creeps into our everyday.

Neena Wang

Never Alone
oil on canvas
18″ x 24″

Neena Wang, Never Alone, 2020

I am a multidisciplinary artist whose work explores unseen connections across time, space, and the sensory landscape. My work seeks to make visible the deep entanglement of seemingly isolated objects, actors, and events in order to reveal nonlinear timelines and nontraditional relationships, and to unsettle our collective human memory and imaginary.

June 2020

Surge Witrön

R.S.V.P.
Cardboard, Yupo Paper, Acrylic, Spray Paint, Ink, Readymade-Material
4′ x 4′

“R.S.V.P.” A body of work created during shelter in place. As the Pandemic became a day-to-day process and familiar routines became inaccessible. Visual language and a Movement became a D.N.A. Cardboard, collage elements, gestural mark making, my grandmother’s table runner became a blending responding to “A seat at the Table” within the Art institutions system.

Dena Novak

Alchemy and stars
Oil paint
3′ x 4′

Dena Novak, Alchemy and stars, 2020

I am passionate to drive my own art into being an experience of transformation in paint. The paint transforms into landscape, figure and dream. When I paint I struggle with an autonomic nervous system disorder that can debilitate energy and mobility. Painting is “painting through” certain kinds of pain, as I learn to remain with my body wholeness and limits. I have a rare genetic condition called Ehlers Danlos Syndrome. To paint is to put an exquisite imaginative step across the experience banality of physical pain. I shifted from brush to pallets knife with the response of a stronger line in my massive oil paint assemblies.

Jose Cabrera

Los Beatles
Digital Art: Photoshop
13″ x 19″

Jose Cabrera, Los Beatles, 2020

Right before the outbreak we went to Las Vegas to see Cirque de Soleil’s “Love” based off the beatles music and legacy. It was a birthday gift from my wife, but the real gift was seeing the look on my daughters face while she was watching the show. When got home it was Beatles all day long and all night long. We even got a record player to play beatles records we inherited from the grandparents. This art piece came from our love for the Beatles while nesting.

Jason Chen

Jasaint
Sumi Ink on Watercolor Paper

Jason Chen, Jasaint, 2020

Dark release in the aftermath of George Floyd’s Death.

Óscar Corona

Strawberry Flavored Licorice
wire, cotton, denim
6′ x 2′

The soft sculpture is a reflection on the notion of reclaiming chaos. In terms of living through uncertainty, there is a slight glimmer of hope in the idea of welcoming chaos with open arms. Having agency and recognizing our autonomy is a powerful feeling of affirmation. It may feel like a heavy buzz of nerves- however, having that sense of security and fearlessness is a survival tool that keeps one centered and balanced throughout this sterile, dystopian time. Although cynical, the work reads as a pink flower pinwheel, reminiscent of 1960s Mid Century Mod motifs. With a grimacing chain looming over. A simple visual analogy to the feeling of uncertainty in our current state of home. The work serves as a cathartic representation of the ‘lore for the lust for life’. A soft sculpture to ponder on the clashing agents of the sublime and the abysmal. A portal to the other realm from which one can channel peace of mind, poder, y esperanza.

Georgina Lewis

how do you sleep at night? part 1
graphite and acrylic paint on paper
9″ x 12″

Georgina Lewis, how do you sleep at night? part 1, 2020

This is part of an ongoing series of work that I began in March of this year. Were it not for COVID19 I would never have made these. I don’t usually make such things. These are drawings made from the materials I had on hand when I began suddenly sheltering in place. Some of them are text and others image based.

I *had* to make the first ones, now I make them because I want to or because I fear failing to do so and falling into stasis. I make them as a way of engaging. You have to take anxiety and anger on and fight with them. “Wrongness” and error figure heavily and are points to push past whilst acknowledging that we live in new times of sudden humanness. I think of the drawings as field recordings, or maybe entries in a teenager’s diary, or possibly that same teen’s therapist’s notebook: charting quick emotional changes over time.

July 2020

Jessica Oler

Big Bodies
Paper on canvas; film photography
40″ x 60″

Jessica Oler, Big Bodies, 2020

My present work is involved with space, movement, stagnation, and history that is generally worked through with video, photography, and/or collage. Seriality and collage are my instincts. A collection of various, specific things. Photographs. Tree bark. Trees. History. My body. Doorways to unknown lands. Skin. Implications of skin. Compositionally sound amongst the conceptual chaos. I utilize sociopolitical research and personal narrative as a guiding force to work through larger racial, geographical, and social investigations surrounding Blackness. At the moment I’m continuing to work through the concept of “unprotected Black female flesh”, initially born from my lived experience with Multiple Sclerosis. With “unprotected Black female flesh” as the centerpiece of my thought processes, the various offshoots of ingrained, systemic injustices are investigated. My most recent paper on canvas series focuses on Black Geographies.

Emme Paige

My Thought Garden
Watercolor
9″ x 12″

Emme Paige, My Thought Garden, 2020

I wanted to highlight the impact that COVID has had on our connection with nature. Many people have begun realizing how grounding yourself with earth whether it be with houseplants or in a garden has had a positive impact on their mental health. I wanted to express that. I wanted to express the connection between us as people and the environment around us.

Carol Anne McChrystal

Pasalubong #2
Handwoven Mylar Food Wrappers, Archival Film, Grommets
34″ in x 68″

My materially-driven sculpture and videos work through chemical processes and labor-intensive hand-making to explore the legacy of colonialism and trade, as well as the ways in which the climate catastrophe has compounded these histories of inequity. Inhabiting the tension between Earth’s immense history and the absurdly mundane everyday experience of plastic and labor, my practice consolidates painstakingly hand-made and mass-produced consumables in order to pry open a speculative space in which to resist the means-ends rationale of late capitalism.

My practice has recently been focused on banig weaving—an ancestral practice that has its roots as much in utility as it does in beauty and aesthetics. For hundreds of years, the art form has been passed along from mother to daughter, and has traditionally been a way for indigenous Filipinos to create in community. Historically woven from the readily available leaves of the pandan palm and used primarily for sleeping, banig are considered to be the most basic form of shelter.

“Pasalubong #2” was handwoven at home in Los Angeles after my plans to integrate with a local weaving community in my family’s province in the Philippines were cancelled due to the global pandemic. My take on the banig references a migrant workforce and threatened economic stability in the wake of increasing and intensifying global ecological disaster. In this piece, the use of instant noodle wrappers invokes the gesture of using what’s readily available in the immediate environment and the ethos of doing the best you can with what you’ve got.”

Yvette Gellis

Covid Poppies
oil, acrylic, graphite, pieces of cut canvas, designed collage pieces
51.5“ x 41.5“

Yvette Gellis, Covid Poppies, 2020

By Combining the flatness of abstraction with perspectival figuration, I strive to deliberately confound a sense of space between the grounded reality of the viewer’s domain and the nebulous, intangible, shifting pictorial space that lures us in – beckoning us to explore the deep space beyond our physical reach.

Most recently, I’ve setup a meditative interpretation of the natural world while traversing the ever-shifting boundaries between representation and abstraction, or, rather, between notions of control and elements of chance. The cyclical motif of leaves or poppies provides an imagistic structure, surpassing traditional tropes to represent not the ephemeral, but the omnipresent. One sacred leaf left at the door of my studio became the many leaves that connected to all living things, people, animals, plants – a universal connection. The one leaf became an altar, proof of eternal love.

Schelsey Mahammadie-Sabet

Bored
Acrylic
8.5″ x 11″

Schelsey Mahammadie-Sabet, Bored, 2020

This is a visualization of boredom.

Luciana Abait

Untitled
C-print
20″ x 16″

Luciana Abait, Untitled, 2020

This piece is a metaphor for what “home” means during this pandemic, not only to myself but also to hundreds of millions of people around the globe. The boundaries created by the architectural spaces in each house have been totally demolished. Different areas in homes have acquired new roles, such as office space, classrooms and even therapy session rooms. Our own roles, within our families, have changed in many cases as well, as we have acquired more responsibilities and tasks. Many of us, have somehow become different people during these trying times. As seen in my piece, a toy- house has been placed in a washing machine and gone through many washing cycles (as washing is one of the ways to fight the Covid-19 virus). This washing machine also questions the roles that each gender has been traditionally assigned within a family and it asks if these roles have been maintained during the pandemic or have they been switched or mixed up. In the scene, walls are no longer existing. The perfect doll-house has transformed into a sci-fi/spaceship environment that presents an uncertain and uninviting present and dystopian future.

Aska Irie

Home Video
video
01:11 (loop)

Using a variety of materials, including beads, buttons, sequins, acrylic paint and ink, I construct fantastical, abstract and geometric landscapes and portraits that reflect upon urban and popular culture, and my own personal life experiences.

The proposed work is comprised of a series of very short animated videos that reflect upon my quotidian life in quarantine and my playful response to pandemic related issues such as toilet paper, taking walks around the neighborhood just to get out of the house and the virus itself. These were initially all looping segments to create a mega-one-minute video compilation simply titled “Home Video”.

Renée Fox

Ophelia (Falling is Frightening)
Acrylic and colored pencil on panel
18″ x 18″

Renée Fox, Ophelia (Falling is Frightening)

The absence of social gatherings since March has been isolating. With the weight of the global pandemic, social unrest and corrupt politics, reading is a therapeutic distraction. Re-reading Hamlet reintroduced me to the character Ophelia, also well known as the subject of the painting “Ophelia” by John Everett Millais, one of the most important works of the mid-nineteenth century. Shakespeare’s Ophelia is largely undeveloped and a scapegoat for Hamlet’s contempt for women (his mother in particular). Imagining Ophelia’s experiences in detail I began to see her as a person with free agency. While she herself is not physically present in “Ophelia (Falling is Frightening)”, tangled strands of blonde hair suggest her fall through shadowy brambles.

Toban Nichols

Corona-fucking-cation
(a photo & audio essay)
digitally manipulated photography, single channel audio
03:56

My work involves visual distortion. The investigation of this distortion produces a self-reflexive understanding of digital technology that appropriates the semiotic nature of visual language. These images are then manipulated into a photographic or video medium. The final work attempts to destroy and reconstruct cultural significance and raise questions about the mediation of art vis-a-vis technology.

The main influences in my art practice have traditionally been color, texture, & motion. I am inspired and motivated by the idea of movement and the flash of color. Much of my print & video work revolves around movement, whether that imposes itself as physical motion implied by the human body or the impression of movement by natural forces. I am drawn to the way water & wind enforce themselves on the things around them.

As a child in Kansas, which has rather extreme weather, I was always captivated by an open window with a strong breeze blowing the sheer curtains in my Grandmother’s home. The way the wind made the curtains undulate and flow was mesmerizing. This sort of motion has shown up in various places in my work throughout history. The other major influence on my work is color, bright color to be exact. Being emotionally drawn deeply into bold color is an essential part of who I am as an artist. Looking at reds, yellows, oranges, and sometimes a very specific pistachio green is an experience in sensory overload and leaves me awash in lush, flowing ecstasy.

Andrea Nhuch

Perambulando | Wondering
Canvas and thread
24″ x 16.5″

Andrea Nhuch, Perambulando | Wondering, 2020

Perambulando, the Portuguese word for wandering, is a series of works created during the 2020 quarantine. Confined to my home, switching between my physical and mental worlds, I wander and wonder about the meaning of our existence and the lack of control about our futures. Plain black threads are let loose on raw canvas. They go backwards and forwards. Sometimes running freely and minimally, other times obsessively and hesitantly. Nudges, twists and turns ensure boundaries are kept while registering my whereabouts. This series challenges my need for space and volume creation yet it stays true to my commitment to transformation of pedestrian materials and perception: sewn stitches double as drawn lines.

Evelyn Chávez

Hollow Time
DSLR

Evelyn Chavez, Hollow Time, 2020

My role as the observer inspires me to create compelling images that embody the core of each story. I aim to guide the viewer’s interpretation of an image through an act of deepened thought and emotion. Within each image, I would like the viewer to feel a sense of wonder.

As I continue to adjust to the COVID-19 lifestyle, I have found myself in my garage, which is also my creative space, a lot more frequently. Here I am surrounded by art, cleaning products, my work space, my humidifier, and a lot more TV accessibility than ever (which I’ve learned to use as a tool thanks to Amazon’s Fire Stick). As the hours pass by ungracefully, I continue to find balance on the thin line between work and time. This has become my new reality.

Yukako Ando

Lattice work [VR]
digital drawing
dimensions variable

Yukako Ando, Lattice work [VR], 2020

The point of departure for my work is my personal experience of the real world as a complex living environment, in which truth and fiction blend as equal parts of our consciousness, forming a unity that serves as a platform for our subjective experience of the world.

This personal existential foundation is the source of the substance and history of my works, which are composed of ostensibly experimental actions and guidelines for action in multimedia installations on the basis of interwoven creative processes.

My interest is focused on the little everyday phenomena I regard as building blocks from which the fundamental questions of life are configured.

By taking up these seemingly ordinary details and episodes and rendering them visible in my work, I build a bridge to a higher collective approach to existence.

My works evolve as synchronous processes into a personal reality. Thus they consistently reflect my own personal present while serving as an expression of a fundamental need for orientation at the same time.

Viewed in terms of content, they reflect the ambivalent relationship between communication and restraint, between work and pleasure, and between stillness and movement.

Nica Aquino

ISOLATION 2020
Digital video
03:35

I originally filmed the footage for this video for an online class I taught for Oxy Arts that was published back in May 2020. A lot of us who are actually staying in have been looking for moments of comfort. I filmed these outside views of my neighborhood to offer viewers something calming to enjoy from home. The abstractions are symbolic for how abstract these times feel. The music is from one of my fav. video games, offering not only a relaxing soundtrack, but a slice of nostalgia, for those of us who were raised on video games in the 90s. I was very sheltered as a kid and video games were my ticket to another world. I hope this video can offer some escapism to a better time and place.

Caroline Yoo

who, where, i
LED neon, Neon, Digital Photography
13″ x 40″

Caroline Yoo, who, where, i, 2020

“who, where, i” is a photography series exploring my two ties to two different backgrounds.

I am of Korean heritage but was born in Kansas. I speak both languages with an accent, English with a lisp and bad grammar, Korean with an American accent and worse grammar. Forever in the between.

During the pandemic season I had to pack up my life in Los Angeles and move to South Korea, a country I haven’t lived in since I was 6. The two photos show my displacement but also show the journey of finding where my home is, where both homes only accept parts of my identity. The yellow neon sign spelling F-O-R-E-I-G-N-E-R, laying on USA ground. The white neon sign spelling 미-국-인 translated to American, on the window of my family’s apartment in South Korea. Both neon signs are words only accepting one fragment of who I am. The FOREIGNER portraying how my skin will always be the indicator of how I am treated in the West and the 미국인 (American) an indicator of how I will never be Korean enough for my motherland.

Slurs masquerading as societal norms.

Naomi Tucker

Milagros cósmicos
Diptych 7″x15″ (7″x7″ each)

I frequently make art focused on the process of creating using a variety of media. I make art that is soothing to create, and art that challenges me to puzzle out solutions. While I don’t currently wood fire pottery, I loved the process of making pieces, placing them in the kiln, stoking the fire directly in the chamber, and allowing the ash and flames to create glaze and splashes of color. I am in awe of and strive to co-create with the powers beyond me. I am influenced by time spent outdoors observing nature, my dreams, and many places I have lived including: Japan, Finland, Switzerland, Mexico, Iowa and Los Angeles.

I created this diptych, Milagros cósmicos, during the pandemic, from memories of another world. In spring 2019, I saw a snail in Kenneth Hahn Park, slowly making its way. When I looked closer, there was a small green inchworm inching its way along the snail’s shell! My shock was mixed with gratitude for this reminder to slow down and observe carefully. I imagined the inchworm on a moving walkway, not to speed up the journey like in an airport, but to slow all the way down. All year, I returned to this imagery as a touchstone: How do I continue to slow down? How do I reconcile this life I love with all the ways it is not aligned with my values (e.g. the carbon footprint of commuting all over Los Angeles)?

The milagros (miracle charms) are from when I lived in Mexico in 2008-9. In previous years, I used milagros to ask for help with specific situations. This time I dreamt of arrangements of milagros and it became clear that I am asking for help for our cosmos, for our planet and all its life. Our home.

Teresa Flores

I Got It From My Mama
Video
30:54

My family doesn’t dance much–we chill. I’ve been gliding by on the dance floor with the skills I picked up dancing folklórico in third grade and booty shaking classes I bought on Groupon. This video is a day in the life of a multi-generation Chicana practicing the Latin dances she was never taught. My focus drifts between the screen and my body. It’s an exercise in teaching the body to remember without mirrors- to reflect a muscular memory and a diasporic relationship we all carry.

Since quarantine began, I’ve rearranged my living room to open up space for making art, making money, and building up my health. This small space has been a studio for art, yoga, Feldenkrais, video production, and dance. Having the space to practice and produce in my home leaves me with only my internal resistance. In the deepest days of quarantine, I examine the source of my own resistance and challenge myself to use the physical space to break through. Sometimes it feels like I’m incubating here and what I put out into the digital world is a dispatch of my struggles in quarantine.

Jerri Allyn

On the Return of the Holy Prostitute – Proposed: 3-D Shield of Quedishtu for consenting Sex Workers during CoronaV
Pen, marker on xerox of found image, paper
8.5″ x 11″

Jerri Allyn, On the Return of the Holy Prostitute - Proposed: 3-D Shield of Quedishtu for consenting Sex Workers during CoronaV, 2020

What kind of shield – emotional, psychological and physical protection – might Sex Workers want reflected in a mask of their own making, while working the streets?

I was gang raped at 7 years. No one came to my aid, I started acting out, was an unwed mother in high school, dipped my toe into prostitution, and jail. Mentors guided me away from selling my body, toying with suicide, and into the arts, which healed my soul. Now, as a pleasure activist (thank you a.m.brown!) I have expanded my exploration of sex negative human trafficking > dark web porn > sexual healing > sex education > > sex positive everything > to balance out the spectrum of sexuality and include > sacred sexuality > and the Yoni, the divine process of creation, regeneration, community, collaboration.

“Once upon a time in Sumeria, in Mesopotamia, in Egypt, there were no whore houses. There were Temples of the Sacred Prostitutes. Men were cleansed, not sullied, morality was re-stored, not desecrated, sexuality was not perverted, but divine. The original ‘whore’ was a priestess, the conduit to the divine, the one through whose body one entered the sacred arena and was restored. Warriors, soiled by combat within the world of men, came to the Holy Prostitute, the Quedishtu, “the undefiled one,” in order to be cleansed and re-united with the gods …” [with the goddesses, or gender variant creation.] – Mentor Deena Metzger, Re-Vamping the World: On the Return of the Holy Prostitute.

August 2020

Jungmok Yi

i once drowned in the pool of a korean sauna caught in its whirlpool as it drained sucked my foot too hard and i was three and a half.
digital media
8′ X 8′

Jungmok Yi, i once drowned in the pool of a korean sauna caught in its whirlpool as it drained sucked my foot too hard and i was three and a half. , 2020

The lightning turns the night into day and my bed is a time-travel machine.

Since Covid-19, I have spent many hours on my queen sized bed watching tv shows, movies, laying around and playing with my dog. And with countless online meetings and repeats of the same days in my studio apartment, my world seems to only exist in the shape of a screen. I lay on my bed making attempts to escape, but I’m just trapped in the infinite loop of time.

Ace Alamillo

Reality Shift
Collage and ink on paper
8.5″ x 11″

Ace Alamillo, Reality Shift, 2020

As a visual artist and a musician being involved in the local metal, punk, and experimental music scene, the DIY culture has paved the way for my interest in the avant-garde, specifically in the Dada culture. Its aesthetics and the idea of counterculture gave me a new realization to art and the way I perceive art in many aspects. In my art practice, I apply those concepts and theories, in being resourceful, using old materials and scrap as a rejection on spending too much and the fact that utilizing few available materials is a way to challenge your creativity. I have a broad subject matter, ranging from social issues to different historical articles, and in one blink of an eye, I can portray these subject matters into an art form. Most of my works are accompanied by lines and geometric forms and abstraction to assert volume and balance as I’ve also been influenced by Constructivism and Suprematism. Even though I’m creating works that are in a nonsensical or nonobjective way, it is a way of visual storytelling.

Nicholas Frisella

So Cope
Digital photograph minted into a 1/1 non-fungible token (ERC-721)
3024 x 4032 pixels (12.2 megapixels)

Nicholas Frisella, So Cope, 2020

What are we able to accomplish with demons raging in our heads? With life bearing down on us? Sacrificing everything to create is not something I could do. Having to slow down during my ten day COVID quarantine allowed for a lot of self-reflection. COVID has forced all of us to slow down and forced me to revisit the feeling I had forgotten–the quiet calm of creating. My anxiety and isolation needed a healthy outlet and so I found myself creating. I shared these creations via technology in the form of non- fungible tokens and received positive feedback. This led to sales and commissioned work. COVID has forced me to thrive. Like most people I have been home for months. The photograph So Cope was taken during a moment of insomnia on a camping trip. Nature is my church and this church remains open during the pandemic.

Kenneth Kinsley

They Don’t Know How to Really Live In the Space
Acrylic house paint and Lettaset lettering on found wood.
9” x 13”

In April of this year I was watching the wonderful 2017 documentary ”Julian Schnabel: A Private Portrait.” In one segment his son, Olmo, was being interviewed about what it was like growing up in ”Palazzo Chuppi, ” Schnabel’s famous 11-story home/studio in Manhattan. Olmo said that, while it always felt like home to him, his friends were intimidated and ”they don’t know how to live in the space.”
That phrase resonated with me, since lockdown has caused us all to be a bit of a stranger in our own homes. Spaces that were once private are the background for a Zoom meeting and areas to greet friends are left empty.

I use signs and banners in my work as a metaphor for our modern communications. We send out a constant stream of proclamations every day. That which was once only happening in our minds or with those closest to us can now play out in front of the whole world, or as much of it as we allow on our social media platforms. These proclamations, for better or worse, have become our signposts.

These text-based art works try to capture these various shades of our new social norms by turning our attention to the metaphorical signposts. These signs are sometimes direct quotes from others, sometimes observations; they can be the subtext of someone’s musings or they might just be trying to find the humor in our virtual condition.

Xavier Cázares Cortéz

THE NEXT DAY (after The Next Day) From [AD-LIBBED] LINES.
Digital print series
Dimensions variable

My role as the observer inspires me to create compelling images that embody the core of each story. I aim to guide the viewer’s interpretation of an image through an act of deepened thought and emotion. Within each image, I would like the viewer to feel a sense of wonder.

As I continue to adjust to the COVID-19 lifestyle, I have found myself in my garage, which is also my creative space, a lot more frequently. Here I am surrounded by art, cleaning products, my work space, my humidifier, and a lot more TV accessibility than ever (which I’ve learned to use as a tool thanks to Amazon’s Fire Stick). As the hours pass by ungracefully, I continue to find balance on the thin line between work and time. This has become my new reality.

Thank You for Coming & Come Back Soon!

About Acogedor

Acogedor, founded in the summer of 2017, is an intimate project space at the home of artist Nicole Rademacher. The activities usually take place in her front yard. Activities happen sporadically, but each are given the love and attention they deserve. Acogedor means “cozy” in Spanish.

During COVID-19, Nicole has decided to the online space of the Acogedor.Space website to showcase work and organize intimate events.

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